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Citations, Opinions, and Varied Sentence Structure: Weaponry for Battling the Praxis Essays

In the height of examination season, tensions are heightened at the thought of composing copious amounts of essays, especially those that act as gatekeepers for potential career paths, such as the essay portion of the Praxis exams. Traditionally, these compositions are intended to demonstrate the writer’s ability to construct an intelligent argument, as well as provide personal insight into an issue in an academic, professional manner. In instances such as the Praxis exam, with a limited amount of composition time and the added stress of fretting over eventual scores, it is easy to let the anxiety influence the words that cross the page or screen. However, there are specific factors within these essays for which the judges will be searching, and keeping these essay characteristics in mind will enhance the writer’s potential to meet the criteria set before them.

Generally, the simpler of the two essays is that of the informative composition. This section of the essay portion of the exam will test the student’s abilities to provide information through the utilization of the sources that are provided. There won’t be too many sources from which to pull, so try to avoid worrying about the sheer mass of preparatory text that will need to be read before the composition starts. When it comes to the composing stages of this essay, it is imperative that the writer remember to:

  • Avoid brainstorming for too long.
    • This causes the writer to lose time and can be more distracting than helpful.
  • Keep the sources in conversation with one another.
  • Always use citations.
    • This applies to both essays.
  • Avoid providing personal opinions, unless the prompt calls for this specifically.
    • First person “I” is considered unprofessional in this setting.
  • Keep it informative. Argumentation and judgment should not appear in this essay.

The argumentative essay can be considered a challenge, but when considering the figurative checklist that applies to the composition of this type of text, the actual writing process can begin to transform into that of a map that is created by the writer. However, there are a few minor warnings as to providing personal opinion.

  • While these prompts might ask the writer to utilize their own opinion, the “I” should appear as sparingly as possible. Too much personal voice can make the piece sound too informal.
  • Anecdotes should apply completely to the topic at hand and not veer away in the form of a tangent. Essentially, they should only be used when absolutely necessary.
  • When compiling the reasons as to why the author believes a certain way, be sure to pick the most relevant to the topic and the most important. Trivial issues will hold little water in this argument.
  • Be sure to address the opposing issue. This should come near the end of the piece—somewhere just before the conclusion—which will give the writer enough time to refute the point before ending the paper properly.
  • Do not speak in a condescending fashion towards the opposing opinion.
  • As stated beforehand, ALWAYS USE CITATIONS.

While this may sound insignificant in the grand scheme of composition, the varying of sentence structure is incredibly important. The utilization of complex sentences will demonstrate a control over the craft, as well as present the information in a mature manner. Semicolons are a writer’s best friend! For general punctuation and structural regulations, be sure to remember:

  • Semicolons are used to separate independent clauses.
  • Commas should appear before conjunctions when they are being utilized to connect independent clauses.
  • Simple sentences can be effective, but only when used conservatively.

While these lists might appear to be disorienting, the best way to hone these skills is to practice these types of compositions. Example prompts can be found online; additionally, essays from varying levels of success can be accessed on official websites, such as ets.org. Be ready, future educators! Think of outlining these essays like that of a personal lesson plan!

-Morgan